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Discussion Forum - Events - housman


Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Tue 16th Aug 2011, 11:44
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
I was thinking of ordering the DVD, but as I did not see the cameraman (or woman) out on the trail anywhere, I decided not to. Both the previous DVDs have been a disappointment: with hardly any footage of walkers out in the hills. The best by far was the Yoredale DVD where there was a lot of excellent footage away from the checkpoints. Interviews and scenery shots are fine, but can be overdone.

On the Yoredale the photographer set up the camera on the canal path about 5 miles from the start, after the field had become strung out, and just videoed every one coming past. That way he got the whole of the 9am walkers start field. Everyone had fun looking for themselves and their friends on the DVD. The he went into the hills and set up again, videoing many and chatting to some. What I remember most clearly is the night footage of headtorches coming down the hill into Hawes. That really caught the spirit of night walking.

What we need is someone like Steve Clark, with the photography skill and talent, and who is not afraid of getting out into the sticks.
Author: Geoff Deighton
Posted: Mon 15th Aug 2011, 17:48
Joined: 1981
Local Group: High Peak
Thanks John - fixed it now is!
Author: John Sparshatt
Posted: Mon 15th Aug 2011, 17:19
Joined: 1983
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Hi Geoff

This bug should now be fixed. Please let us know of any other issues you may spot. Best Wishes, John
Author: Geoff Deighton
Posted: Sun 14th Aug 2011, 11:15
Joined: 1981
Local Group: High Peak
Thanks Eileen - that works! For any Google Chrome users like me the "Zoom" control is under the spanner that is top right of the screen.
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Sat 13th Aug 2011, 21:41
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Geoff. I have this problem also. I solved it by zooming out to 75%. (on bottom right of screen)

Hopefully this will help! Eileen
Author: Geoff Deighton
Posted: Sat 13th Aug 2011, 16:33
Joined: 1981
Local Group: High Peak
Firstly, is it just me who can’t read the posts on this thread properly because the text disappears under the green box on the right? This doesn’t happen on any other thread.

Secondly, I think this was a better DVD than last year’s because I am actually on this one! However, I agree with much of what Rebecca has to say about it. I don’t think any of the recent DVDs have been as good as the ones Martyn Hollingworth produced.

Geoff
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Fri 12th Aug 2011, 16:42
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
A hint of sarcasm there John.

As a member who as done more challenge walks then I care to remember I'm always please when our members take time so I can enjoy myself. Publishing Strider must be one of the hardest jobs within the LDWA and to be honest I could only guess at the number of hours that is put in each year by our members to produce it 3 times a year. And for that I'm greatful.

John as a national committee member should you be encouraging us rank and file members to be more outspoken on here.


ian.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Fri 12th Aug 2011, 8:48
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
I agree its a difficult one. I guess as I normally subject my non walking friends and family to a public viewing of the DVD and as the DVD could be used to generate more interest in the LDWA and recruit new members, a commentary would have given it broader appeal and helped explain what was going on, and focusing on a small group helps the viewer the build a rapport with the entrants, for me it just seemed to lack something compared to the Yoredale which had me on the edge of my seat willing the entrants to carry on, but having said that I did enjoy it and I am grateful for the opportunity to have purchased the memory.
Author: Dr. John Batham
Posted: Thu 11th Aug 2011, 22:11
Joined: 2007
Local Group: East Yorkshire
Frankly, what can be shown other than walkers leaving the start, entering/leaving checkpoints, eating, bearing up bravely, shown against scenaric backdrops, collapsing at the finish....
Author: Dr. John Batham
Posted: Thu 11th Aug 2011, 22:02
Joined: 2007
Local Group: East Yorkshire
You are a very naughty boy Ian! You have brought some criticism onto this site
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Thu 11th Aug 2011, 17:24
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
I remember when the Cleveland 100 video came out, it did show the same one's (mainly runners) all the time and for one was disappointed about it. Maybe this was because the cameraman was moving along the route checkpoint by checkpoint so they met up with the same people I don't know, but I would have liked to see more of one's that arn't in the click of members who seem to get in most of the photos you see. Some of the past striders have been more like family photo albums.

Now that has put the cat amongst the pigeons.

ian.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Thu 11th Aug 2011, 8:37
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Just watched the DVD - it was good to be reminded of the event!

I enjoyed it, but personally I was a little disappointed - I'll probably be shot in flames for daring to give some construtive criticism but here goes:

The first DVD 'yoredale 100' told a story and keyed in on personalities and tended to follow the same people round so the viewer could share their successes and failures, and it built tension and was good for all my family to watch, not only people who did the event. My whole family enjoyed it as it explained about the event and the area. It was brilliant and I have watched it several times since even though I didn't personally feature.

The Housman DVD I thought lacked a 'story line' and for me, didn't build the picture of the event, it was simply a shot of the start and then several shots of people entering and leaving checkpoints, with pictures of the map in between to give the viewer an idea of where they were in the event in between random shots of the countryside - I actually got a bit bored watching it.

I guess doing it this way ensures more people get their moments of fame and appear in shot, but I felt that it didn't cash in on the wonderful personalities that make up the LDWA. For me it would have make better viewing to have spent more time getting to know individuals and following them through their highs and lows throughout the event, showing their pains and happiness, with a decent commentary explaining about the route and the event itself. I felt it also lacked continuity and shots flicked from finishers in the rain on monday morning, back to Sunday afternoon, back to monday morning etc and I got a bit lost, let alone someone watching it who hasn't done the event..

Overall it was nice to watch but definately for me would have been preferable if were have been on the lines of a documentary - i.e. - introduction, several key characters and a commentary.
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Thu 4th Aug 2011, 16:36
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
Just seen the Housman DVD - its really good. Apparently needs some tidying up and will be posted in a few days. Still a chance to order one - or more - please send cheque for £10 to Micro Video, High Holme, Kendrick's Bank, Bayston Hill, Shrewsbury SY3 0EH
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Wed 20th Jul 2011, 18:19
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
End of this month I am told
Author: Geoff Deighton
Posted: Mon 18th Jul 2011, 10:25
Joined: 1981
Local Group: High Peak
Any news on when the DVD might be out please?
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Sun 17th Jul 2011, 8:33
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
New delivery of T shirts and polos just arrived - expect them in the post soon if you have ordered
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Mon 13th Jun 2011, 8:23
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Yes - that was us! The rocket launcher recorded 104.56m for the whole event in the end. Yes - we were tired the second time you saw us, but Tony and his magic sandals faired slightly better than I did - no crushed toes, only problem was sheep droppings getting squashed in the sandal....
Author: Philip Clarke
Posted: Fri 10th Jun 2011, 17:52
Joined: 1995
Local Group: Marches
Ah Rebecca your partner was wearing a rocket launcher on his wrist! We spoke brielfy early on and late on.

Glad you made it but it did look a bit painful towards the end?

How does he walk that far in sandals?
Author: Steve Jelfs
Posted: Fri 10th Jun 2011, 8:42
Joined: 1998
Local Group: Heart of England
yes what a great event , i was that severe bendyman that needed help into bridges , .i would like to thank all the beds , bucks , northants check point staff who looked after me so well , merrian , and sue for all the hugs ect .
All the check points where great ( after the first two ) . all the staff at the finish , who could not do enough for you .
all in all a great event again by the marches group ( a credit to the l d w a )
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 8th Jun 2011, 12:09
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Funnily enough I clocked up my best time on this one. I put it down to the promise of beer at the end.

I don't think it was too tough - initially like Tony I thought so, but my time told different story...Every 100 I have done so far has been a totally different animal from the next and all have had a theme and definate sting in the tail for different reasons - weather on the welsh 100, Ingleborough on the yoredale - stony flinty paths wrecking your feet on the wessex, the off piste sections before and after the breakfast stop, and the sheer boredom of the forestry trails on the HOS 100........

And the Housman....??? Its got to be the relentless hills, right up to the end, going up over that hill on the mortimer trail after coming into Ludlow was hell and a true test of willpower - coming down was worse than going up - each footfall the blisters were exploding and the pain was immense because mentally when I got into Ludlow I had finished and it seemed wrong to have to leave civilisation again, but the ground was generally kind to the feet, the weather was fair, and the pint at the end fantastic - my partner did the entire walk in walking sandals and waterproof socks......Is that a first?
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Tue 7th Jun 2011, 21:27
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Thank you Martin for your excellent photos. Good photos. and very "on the spot" and Ioved the one with you falling over at the end. I know how you felt! Or felled even.

Thank you for having the energy to take them and the time to post them. check point photos are great- shows how tired we were!
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Tue 7th Jun 2011, 20:37
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
"leaning over syndrome"- I have always wondered how the sufferers of this have felt about it. It seems they don't know and causes no discomfort.Plus the fact that you, Tony, didn't know you were doing it and thought your vertical plane was correct is curious! Maybe best to take a plumb line along on these 100s!

I have only seen it on the 100s. Is it the muscles to the spine or the spine vertebrae?
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Tue 7th Jun 2011, 20:37
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
"leaning over syndrome"- I have always wondered how the sufferers of this have felt about it. It seems they don't know and causes no discomfort.Plus the fact that you, Tony, didn't know you were doing it and thought your vertical plane was correct is curious! Maybe best to take a plumb line along on these 100s!

I have only seen it on the 100s. Is it the muscles to the spine or the spine vertebrae?
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Tue 7th Jun 2011, 19:19
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
Many thanks to Marches Group and all involved in organising the Housman. To put on two Hundreds in four years is a tremendous task so all credit to Janet and team for pulling it off.
Those Shropshire hills were certainly a test, not particularly high but unrelenting. Usually on Hundreds there are several sections where you can stride out and clock up some miles without difficulty. On the Housman I only recall one such section, the Long Mynd ridge, and there you had to climb to the highest point on the route first! I would only quibble with the route on the last section - it might have been kinder to take us along the river and over the field paths past Hucksbarn rather than that last climb.
Was it too tough? Having recorded my slowest time in eight Hundreds I was inclined to think so on Sunday, but on mature reflection it must be right to have a range of events from one like the Chiltern Landmarks where a conscious effort was made to get as many finishers as possible to this one, which was a real challenge. Now can we have one or two easier ones please?
High points? The views on Saturday afternoon when the weather was at it's best. The welcome at checkpoints, which seems to get better every year. A couple of first time runners I spoke to just couldn't believe that the attention they were getting was normal.
Low points? Crawling up and slithering down the hills in the dark on the section from Newcastle to Mainstone. Having to climb up yet another viciously steep hill after descending from Long Mynd before I could have a helping of Cornwall & Devon's rhubarb & custard.
Curiously I experienced the "leaning over sideways" syndrome for the first time in several Hundreds. I wasn't aware of it until it was pointed out to me and I suffered no discomfort as a result. I attempted to correct it but found it quite difficult to judge where vertical was.
Posted: Sun 5th Jun 2011, 14:59
My (not very good) photographs are here:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29651652@N06/sets/72157626877977258/
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Fri 3rd Jun 2011, 20:00
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Well Tony- for someone who has completed the Joss Naylor Challenge, the 100 shouldn't have been too difficult for you! But I know, the extra mileage is hard.

So 104 miles you recorded? That means I did about 108/9 miles after getting rather lost on the first night section! Yes it was a toughie.

The best bit? The marquee at breakfast for washing the feet and everything. Lovely fresh soft,cool and clean green grass for the sore feet! What luxury- no dirty,wet,slippery floors. I managed to get a strip wash and felt almost fresh afterwards. Well done for that idea!

It all seems like a dream now= just the swollen ankles and blisters to remind me thta I did walk the 100 last weekend.

Thank you to the Marches group and the LDWA for providing it.
Author: Tony Deall
Posted: Thu 2nd Jun 2011, 22:38
Joined: 1985
Local Group: Cumbria
Yes this was a tough 100 but I've yet to come across one that isn't! The really hard ones for me are when my feet disintegrate! Luckily this hasn't happened since the Lakeland 100 and I have no explanation for this apart from surmising that my feet may be becoming tougher with advancing years!

It was a great Event and it was interesting to hear 'comments' from many I came across about the amount of ascent. Me and the knees were only interested in the amount of descent! Fortunately they had a reasonable day and my main problem was getting sore legs over all those stiles!!

For what it's worth my GPS and altimeter watch seemed to tell me I'd climbed some 17,000 feet and travelled 104 miles.Not that it really matters - it was what it was!
Interestingly the only time the climbing upset me was on the steep road out of Edgton...I nearly wept with the unfairness of it!!
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Thu 2nd Jun 2011, 11:05
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
For a journey on foot through British history and prehistory, the Housman Hundred would be hard to beat: Bronze Age burial mounds, Iron Age hill forts, Roman roads, Offa’s Dyke, Norman castles, the Wars of the Roses, and the Napoleonic Wars. The scenery was spectacular and the views panoramic: the hills and valleys of a particularly beautiful part of Britain. And all through the late spring countryside with new lush green growth (of nettles, too, unfortunately). I even saw a few bluebells. The weather was good: enough wind and rain to remind us that a Hundred was to be taken seriously (who could need that?) but not enough to threaten or slow us.

As always, friendly and encouraging faces at the checkpoints, everyone eager to do what they can to help the walkers. Hot meals just where they were needed (wonderful baked potatoes). Bridges CP was a cheerful place as I passed through (encouraged by not one but two hugs from Merrian). It was good to get off the Long Mynd, but Marches kept the challenge going right until the end.

I have vivid memories of coming down to Knighton in the gathering dusk the first night and to Whittytree the second, of the birds singing at dawn on leaving Mainstone and in the Mary Knoll Valley, and of looking across at the Stiperstones from Long Mynd: that gave me a strong sense of satisfaction: been there, done that bit.

The snippets of Housman’s poetry enhanced the journey. I had hoped to ‘come you home of Sunday’, but the hours slipped away as the aches and pains grew. When the bell rang (though tolled might be a better word for me) as I entered the hall at the finish, I felt more like walking wounded than Housman’s conquering hero.

Thank you Marches for hosting this great event, and all the checkpoint marshals for their unstinting help and support, and Raynet, always there in the background should you need them. All in all a tough but very rewarding Hundred.
Author: John King
Posted: Thu 2nd Jun 2011, 8:38
Joined: 2002
Louise i have put some Info in the bothy, rather than Hijack the Housman thread
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Wed 1st Jun 2011, 20:37
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
Hi John, I'm not keen on using NSAIDS either, so I'm interested in the 'ginger'. Can you elaborate? Is that drinking ginger tea, or administering ginger to your feet in someway. I'd like to try it. Thanks Louise
Author: John King
Posted: Wed 1st Jun 2011, 19:26
Joined: 2002
Yep it was a cracking event tough, challenging satisfying, I take my hat off to the Marches group of the LDWA the planning of the route was superb and took us over what must be all the best parts of that part of the country, The route description was pretty much spot on and easy to follow (well at least until I reached the brain dead phase in the latter stages).

I opted for a Pair of NB Road shoes given the dry conditions underfoot and found the extra cushioning to be a huge bonus, these combined with a pair of ALDI £2-95 running socks seem to have worked well with very little damage done.

I have to admit there was a spell on Long Mynd where the wind was irritating me, but probably not as much as it was irritating the members of the Gliding Club grounded in the clubroom.

Yes as ever all the checkpoint staff were superb and worked so hard to make the event what it should be a true FLAGSHIP EVENT for the LDWA.
I have done a few LDWA events now and I have to agree with Molehill the true hardcore LDWA walkers should never be underestimated, and on the odd occasion I can keep up with one of the for long enough to chat to I find them to be really helpful and encouraging, with a lot of good tips and antidotes, to keep you smiling through the low points

It was good to meet and chat to Don't Fear the Sweeper for a while , I found the discussion between DFTS and and a GP we meet, about NSAIDS to be interesting but it did nothing to sway me toward them and I will stick with Ginger as an anti inflammatory, that for me is one of the great things about these LDWA events they bring together such a broad spectrum of folk that there is always interesting conversations to be had and much to learn from people, that is assuming you are not looking for a time.

In the words of A E Housman it was truly ` A JOURNEY THROUGH THOSE BLUE REMEMBERED HILLS`
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 1st Jun 2011, 12:10
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Big thanks to everyone - great event, and wonderful checkpointers....route was just a bit too flat though, couldn't you have thrown some hills in .....:-)
Author: Ian J Berry-Bowers
Posted: Wed 1st Jun 2011, 11:36
Joined: 2010
Local Group: Wiltshire
Fiona - I am so pleased to know you're safe and well now. We chatted a bit while you were waiting for the ambulance and a few folks were trying to persuade you to re-consider your decision. Retirement is the hardest decision of all to make and it was very brave of you to do so and fight another day. What is your next target?

Ian
Author: Nigel Coe
Posted: Wed 1st Jun 2011, 9:36
Joined: 2009
Local Group: Lakeland
Ah! Perhaps there wasn’t a field before the stile. I think it may have been the stile in the distance in these two shots of Nick Ham’s: http://www.flickr.com/photos/26082075@N05/5783020009/in/set-72157626730285195/ (between the road and the uphill section) and http://www.flickr.com/photos/26082075@N05/5783021131/in/set-72157626730285195/ (at the bottom of the enclosed uphill section). I’ll reread the description…
Author: Nigel Coe
Posted: Tue 31st May 2011, 21:19
Joined: 2009
Local Group: Lakeland
Below is the text of an email about a fall I had on the route that I’m planning to send to the appropriate Rights of Way team but despite revisiting the route description I cannot work out where the incident happened - can anyone help? I seem to remember a field then the stile in question then about 50 metres of uphill, possibly followed by traversing to the left, all in open rather than wooded countryside. I think it was in the first half of the route, mostlikely on the Mortimer Way.

'I am writing about an experience I had on a stile with the hope that it will influence stile deployment and design.

I took part in the Long Distance Walkers Association’s annual 100-mile walk, the Housman Hundred, on the 28th and 29th of May. It mostly followed the Mortimer Way, Offa’s Dyke Path and Shropshire Way. The walk had many (many!) stiles. A small number had barbed wire on them and a couple were wobbly but those hazards are easy to spot and I’m not writing about them. There was only one I had a problem with.

I cannot be absolutely certain of the location where the problem occurred, but from studying the directions and map afterwards I think it was at OS Ref ???, where there was a stile followed by a steep hill when going in a ??? direction.

Many of the stiles on the Mortimer Way section of the walk did not have the normal steps consisting of planks at right angles to the fence-line, but instead had a single, fairly thin, plank each side of the fence, quite close and parallel to it.

Owing to the thinness of the step and its closeness to the fence I had been placing my foot at about 30 degrees to the fenceline for many of these stiles. But this time I placed it at 90 degrees to the fenceline in order that I could move off quicker afterwards. To do this, only the back of my foot could be supported by the step, but this should have been OK. The next thing I knew was that I plunged forward to the ground and my trainer was ripped from my foot: as I moved off the step my foot had canted down at the front and up at the back as expected but the top of the back of the trainer had caught under either a wire, which I believe was a continuation of the fence through the stile, or on another piece of horizontal wood.

I did not appear to be injured, I and my companions at the time laughed about it and I carried on and completed the walk. However, over the last miles I repeatedly retied my laces on that shoe to try and relieve pain on the top of my foot, which I attributed to my feet swelling and the laces being too tight, but in retrospect I think it was bruising caused by the violence of the trainer being ripped off.

While I made light of it at the time, I count myself lucky that the space in front didn’t have anything I could have injured myself on and that the trainer came off, as otherwise I could have broken a bone, as could an older person subject to the same fall.

The reason I’m writing is not to claim compensation (I hate the compensation culture and the avoidance of personal responsibility), but to ensure that either this particular stile is altered if it is a one-off as regards its design, or that this non-British-Standard type of stile is not used in future. I can see how the design might be cheaper than a conventional stile and know that you cannot enforce the British Standard on a landowner, but that has to be weighed up against possible compensation for a litigious accident victim. Also, with only one step each side, these stiles are hard for shorter people to negotiate.'
Author: Bill Lancashire
Posted: Tue 31st May 2011, 12:11
Joined: 2003
Local Group: South Wales
Thanks to all involved for such a wonderful, enjoyable and memorable event.

Thanks to Al for publishing the temporary list of results which are also on the 'Housman 100 web page', but I couldn't help smiling when I saw my result: completion time 61.55h. Wow, did I really walk for that long :) - I think a calc. error of an extra day got in somehow.

Bill.
Author: Al Rodger
Posted: Tue 31st May 2011, 10:04
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Dorset
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF HOUSMAN RESULTS
Having a new toy website to play with (& it's free), I've posted the results sorted by name at this address here (if the link works. It may do if I spell it right):-

https://sites.google.com/site/housman100resultstemperarypost/
Author: Al Rodger
Posted: Tue 31st May 2011, 10:03
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Dorset
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF HOUSMAN RESULTS
Having a new toy website to play with (& it's free), I've posted the results sorted by name at this address here (if the link works):-

[url]https://sites.google.com/site/housman100resultstemperarypost/[/irl]
Author: David Powell
Posted: Tue 31st May 2011, 0:40
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Heart of England
Hi Al
Is that where the missing 15 walkers got to ?
Posted: Mon 30th May 2011, 22:23
Joined: 2006
Fiona; so pleased that you are OK; we were running CP11, and couldn't understand where you had got to,as you were not reported as a retiree, but you hadn't arrived! A radio query at 04:00 eventually clarified that you had retired, thus resolving our worries. Best regards Malcolm, Paul, Pat and Ivan from CP11 (using Mrs Bobbs login!)
Author: Al Rodger
Posted: Mon 30th May 2011, 16:05
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Dorset
Author: Al Rodger
Posted: Mon 30th May 2011, 15:55
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Dorset
Interesting country. Did anyone spot this local feature just 1km off route. Perhaps you made a purchase, or contributed to the stock? (Hoping the link works as it aught'a)


https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/sredir?uname=108549032882048528949&target=ALBUM&id=5612516212196025185&authkey=Gv1sRgCLTpwfHahqeFSQ&feat=email
Author: Fiona Cameron
Posted: Mon 30th May 2011, 10:28
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Surrey
Many thanks to all in the Staffs Group who were on duty on Saturday morning at the Habberley checkpoint when I arrived, and who looked after me so well. Sorry for being a bother, but thank you for not letting me entertain any thoughts of carrying on.

Thank you, too, to Chris Pitt-Lewis for picking me up from Shrewsbury A&E and returning me to the HQ.

Huge congratulations to everyone who managed to finish the Housman 100 - I hope you realise what an achievement that is, because it was an unrelentingly hard route. Commiserations to those who didn't finish - I know how you feel. Don't be too hard on yourself for making the perfectly rational decision (at the time) that enough's enough.

And, thanks and congratulations to the Housman 100 organising team (and spouses, significant others, etc), all the marshals from the Groups at the checkpoints, Raynet, supporters, etc. for making it such a great event.
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Fri 27th May 2011, 15:59
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
About the music....DFH has created a disc with some of the titles mentioned. You'll have to let us know when you get to Bridges John, so we can replace Neil's beloved Abba with Dave's compilation disc.
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Fri 27th May 2011, 12:21
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
Great news for those who need a little liquid refreshment at the end - Edward Wood, local brewer and long time supporter of the Wistanstow Walk who brews the aptly named "Shropshire Lad Ale" is donating some of this excellent local beverage to the event centre to await you at the finish - many thanks Edward!
Author: Melissa Butcher
Posted: Fri 27th May 2011, 8:44
Joined: 2009
Local Group: London
Hi everyone,

I'm looking for 2 volunteers to take part in a small, confidential research project that will help me finally finish my psychology degree! The study is on the experience of taking part in endurance events so I was wondering if there were any participants in the Houseman 100 who might like to take part. I just need one more volunteer, ideally over the age of 60 and male. It just requires 1 hour or your time for an interview in early June, in which you would describe the experience of taking part. I'm based in London so the interview can take place wherever suits you in London or i'm happy to travel to nearby counties. Or over the phone or on skype is also okay. It's completely confidential - the only person who will ever read any of the transcript will be me and my tutor. If anyone could help it would be greatly appreciated - I'll bring coffee and cake! I can be contacted off line on: 07594 307978 or on melissa@globalroaming.at.

And good luck to everyone this weekend.

kind regards

Melissa
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 20:37
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Madeleine: the Marshals' results are on the Housman 100 home page

Here is the direct link

http://www.housmanhundred.co.uk/marshals2011.xls

A bit buggy but understandable
Author: John Sparshatt
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 18:40
Joined: 1983
Local Group: West Yorkshire
How about Oyster Band - Walking Down The Road With You
Oyster Band Clip
for those of you who do not know who they are.
Good Luck to you all - see you Saturday from the comfort of the Mini Bus. John
Second try this time with correct formatting
Author: John Sparshatt
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 18:38
Joined: 1983
Local Group: West Yorkshire
How about Oysterband - Walking Down The Road With You
{url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rYhisBMe-cI&feature=related]Oyster Band Clip{/url}
for those of you who do not know who they are.
Good Luck to you all - see you Saturday from the comfort of the Mini Bus. John
Author: Madeleine Watson
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 18:26
Joined: 2002
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Elton - where are the marshals' event results?
Author: Tim Hughes
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 18:04
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
Music suggestion: Walking in Ithonside by John Jones of Oysterband. The album's called Rising Road...
John's a strong walker and lives near the route: perhaps he'll sing live if you ask him nicely!
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 12:51
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
John, I’m impressed. If I need walking music, I know who to ask.

Merrian, is that a promise? If I get to Bridges I get a cuddle? Now there’s an incentive!

Looking at Dave’s Marshals’ Walk time, I don’t imagine he stopped for food and drink, let alone cuddles. It seems that the harder they are the faster he does them. I suppose his feet were pristine at the end, again.

Having seen the retirement rate of the Marshals’ Walk (with notable names among them), I am now feeling appropriately apprehensive.
Author: Nigel Coe
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 9:45
Joined: 2009
Local Group: Lakeland
I'm feeling nervous & weak too, standard for me before long events. Before the Lakeland 100 I had a headache and stomach ache, but both mysteriously vanished as soon as we started.
Author: John King
Posted: Thu 26th May 2011, 9:29
Joined: 2002
Uplifting Music well I can suggest a few that would give me a boost

WALKIN MAN, Seasick Steve.

CANT STOP THIS THING WE STARTED Bryan Adams

DON`T STOP, and or SHATTERED Rolling Stones

LONG MAY YOU RUN Neil Young

A MOMENTARY LAPSE OF REASON Pink Floyd

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS Joe Cocker

RUNNING ON FAITH Eric Clapton.

PERFECT DAY LOU Reed

SOLDIER ON Oasis.

ITS A LONG LONG WAY UB 40.

EXIT MUSIC Radio Head

INTO THE GREAT WIDE OPEN Tom Petty.

ME AND MY GIN Bessie Smith.

WALKIN THE BOOGIE John Lee hooker

A RUSH OF BLOOD TO THE HEAD Coldplay

GET UP STAND UP Bob Marley.
Author: Neil Fullwood
Posted: Wed 25th May 2011, 21:00
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Marches
Having just completed the erection of Merrian's Marquee at Bridges Youth Hostel, I can confirm that it's roughly the size of the Free Trade Hall in Manchester, with comparable accoustics, more comfy seating, potentially better food and few if any leaks in the roof. Please let us have your suggestions for suitable musical pick-me-ups and we'll see what can be done.
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Wed 25th May 2011, 17:14
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
Things are looking up. Merrian's offering cuddles, and there's a team giving massages at the breakfast point.
I'm planning to leave duvet's (wrapped,hidden) at strategic points along the route, so I can have my usual power nap.
This might just be the longest, but happiest, time I spend doing a 100 !

Garfield
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Wed 25th May 2011, 15:55
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
I’m getting nervous too, and I’m only marshalling. I’ve got so many lists, I need a checklist for the checklists. What am I worrying about? I want you all to finish and I’m there to help you to do that, especially the first-timers. I can probably deal with an emergency, nothing we can do to prepare for that, just have to cope. It’s more the things that are trivial when you look back but, at the time, feel like we’ve let you down….you don’t want the food or drink on offer; we can’t persuade you to carry on even though we know you’ll hate yourself on Tuesday if you drop out; you’re cold and we can’t get you warm; you’ve erred on the navigation; you can’t find the checkpoint; you’re fed up and a cuddle doesn’t help; you can’t find somewhere to sit; we’ve run out of beer. So, make it worth all this worry, don’t even think about dropping out, you will finish…..or else I’ll be so cross with you.
Author: Timothy Evans
Posted: Wed 25th May 2011, 8:32
Joined: 2010
Local Group: Marches
This will be my first 100, although a veteran of 5 Long Mynd Hikes(50 miles). I'm glad to hear stories of seasoned 100 veterans also feeling nervous as my nerves are in tatters this week. Saying that i don't think i could have done any more preperation, i have reccied the route to within an inch of its life and am feeling fitter than ever.

I just want to get started!!

I am doing the 100 with two friends who i am sure will help me through the low points, and i will help them (provided we don't all have a low at the same time!). The Habberley stop is within a mile of one of their houses, so i think that may be her low point!

See you all Saturday morning.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 25th May 2011, 7:50
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Glad its not just me feeling nervous! My low point normally comes about 70 miles in....I'm exhausted and yet still got a substantial way to go - not helped by my customary nausea after breakfast.

I remember on my first 100 (Exmoor) getting to around 70 miles which was near a grave yard - (the occupants of which were probably in a better state than me), floods of tears and refusing to move another step for at least 20 minutes - my poor companion waited patiently for me, gently reminding me that I had to at least walk to the next checkpoint.. Once all my toys were out of the pram, the determination came flooding back and we went on to finish. Now, slightly more experienced, I accept a 100 is like life itself - a very long journey where I accept they'll be major low points but now safe in the knowledge that they do pass to reveal hope and determination (and another check point!) GOOD LUCK EVERYONE!!!
Author: Paul Miller
Posted: Tue 24th May 2011, 23:02
Joined: 1986
Feeling a bit apprehensive myself. Not necessarily the thought of walking 100 miles, as I have done plenty of them in the past, but the fact that I intend have a 'go' at this one and running as much as possible to achieve a good time. My main worry at the moment is that I still feel that I have got the Fellsman of 9 days ago in my legs and the upper thighs are still feeling a bit tight. Adding to the pressure, I decided to badger the people in work for sponsorship so they will be expecting me to finish in a decent time. Can't do much about it now except to relax for the next few days and enjoy it when it arrives. Good luck everyone.

Paul
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Tue 24th May 2011, 13:59
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Definitely a dance, Mike, and danced to the tune of ‘Tiptoe through the Stiperstones’.

Having reccied the route, I’m now concerned that I am looking forward to it with not enough apprehension.

Rebecca, you should be fine: you know you have the strength, it’s just a matter of nursing your feet by keeping rein on your high speed tendencies: the Long Mynd would be a good place to let rip.
Author: Mike Childs
Posted: Tue 24th May 2011, 10:03
Joined: 1990
Local Group: Dorset
Rebecca, I think that is common experience. I get it every time. It seems that a lot of it is unnecessary anxiety, which comes naturally with the physical and mental preparation for the event. I also feel a bit mentally drained lacking in confidence in the week before the event. But I know that (in my case anyway) once we get going, all the bad vibes generally disappear.

I find morale during the event is interesting. For me, the absolute low point is around dusk / nightfall on the first day. Once it sinks in that I have a night walking ahead of me, I try to see it as a rather difficult (but do-able) task that needs to be got out of the way, in order to enjoy the second day (although it may seem counter intuitive, I do enjoy the second day more than the first) At the end of the second day, I start to feel a bit more confident about finishing and the walk into the night seems less of a burden. And we have had some really enjoyable and interesting nights on some hundreds

Of course, things can (and do) go wrong, but sometimes, unexpectedly when things seem at their worst, they can also go right.

I tell myself, don't worry, best foot forward - and it won't be far to the next welcome CP. Where all those kind marshals look after you and encourage you to carry on.

Good luck - in fact, good luck to everyone who is doing the Housman. Hmm, it sounds like a dance - let's "do the housman"
Author: Garfield & Helen Southall
Posted: Tue 24th May 2011, 9:44
Joined: 1991
Local Group: Merseystride
My sentiments exactly, Rebecca! A whole storm has whipped up at work this week, which is managing to take my thoughts away from the weekend, but when I do look to the hills, or feel the evening air on my face, I wear a slight smile at the thought of all that time walking. All those people to share the experience with.

Best of luck, everybody!
(Garfield)
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Tue 24th May 2011, 8:37
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Anyone else feeling rather nervous? I was confident last week, but now the event is galloping nearer.........feel quite sick at the thought. Last weekend I woke up at 3am on sat night and thought......next week I'll still be walking......woke up at 7am sun.......and thought 'still walking'.......tea time sunday........still walking.......argh.....Monday morning.......??????
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Mon 23rd May 2011, 21:25
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
So we’ll have to play ‘Tiptoe through the Stiperstones’. We don’t need a band of rampaging Saxons to add to our troubles. Blisters, bruised feet and aching limbs are quite enough.

Weather is looking not too bad: just light showers Saturday and Sunday, so far. Bit windy, though.
Author: Louise Whittaker
Posted: Fri 20th May 2011, 22:19
Joined: 1994
Local Group: Staffordshire
Ney lad - tha's getting tha counties mixed up - them knights are actually Cheshire knights and they lie beneath Alderley Edge - a legend built on in the Weird Stone of Brasingaman, the Moon of Gomrath - a series of childrens books by Alan Garner.
Posted: Fri 20th May 2011, 1:08
Joined: 1972
And now for some more history/myth to tingle your spine during those dismal hours of the night when your spirit reaches rock bottom and the darkness wraps you in gloom.

It is said that in some cave or mine beneath the Stiperstones there slumbers Wild Edric and his band of knights but should ever England be in peril they will awake and ride to the nation's aid. So given the present crisis then in the blackness preceding dawn and if the clag is down and your torch lights only banks of impenetrable mist you will hear somewhere out there the jingle of harnesses and the whinnies of horses,

In reality Edric was a Saxon Earl who in the years after 1066 led a resistance movement against the encroaching Normans. His band sacked many towns of the Welsh Marches caused general mayhem thereabouts. Eventually he made his peace with King William and faded from history with his passing going unrecorded. Hence the myth.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Thu 19th May 2011, 12:19
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks Matt, that’s fascinating. A lot of history (and prehistory) on this route: the Iron Age forts we pass, the Roman roads we cross, and now the Napoleonic PoW beech avenue. Wonderful!

So during the night section we’ll be besieged by the ghosts of Celtic tribesmen, Roman legionnaires and 19th century Frenchmen. We’ll have to keep Housman’s sinew stiffening advice in mind:

Oh never fear, man, nought’s to dread
Look not to left or right
In all the endless road you tread
There’s nothing but the night.
Author: Matt Clarke
Posted: Thu 19th May 2011, 9:52
Joined: 1973
Local Group: Mid Wales
Re the Beech trees. Napoleonic prisoners of war who were held in Ludlow were marched to Newtown as it was a garrison town. Along the way they were deployed to to do various jobs in the large estates. One of which was planting the Beech trees on Linley hill. They also built the bridge at Caerswys.
Author: Mike Childs
Posted: Tue 17th May 2011, 9:13
Joined: 1990
Local Group: Dorset
Elton, Rebecca - thanks for the realistic updates.

So, it will be a bit like Napoleon's Grand Army "Retreat from Moscow," then ?

Except we get tea and sandwiches at the checkpoints, instead of eating our boots, dead horses and the bark of the trees.

Just kidding, if we prepare mentally for a tough one, I am sure it will be OK on the day. It is not a race. We are not backpacking, and everyone wants to help you finish, so I hope to just keep going (and still going...)
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Tue 17th May 2011, 8:36
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Well done Elton. I did the whole route over 5 days carrying a pack and I was shattered and lost 1/2 stone in weight! Finding water stops was the hardest thing so hopefully (wishful thinking) I'm confident the actual event will feel easier with checkpoints to look forward to and without carrying such a heavy pack, but I agree with you it will be one of the tougher events physically and mentally.

Does anyone know the story behind the Beech Avenue up linley hill and why its there? I agree with Elton - it was beautiful, in fact in one of the B&B's we stayed in there was a lovely oil painting of the Beech Avenue. It almost feels there should be a stately home at the top.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Fri 13th May 2011, 19:34
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Mike: you’re too much of an old stager to be taken in by lies.

I reccied the route last week, camping as I went. I found it a tough route, equivalent to the toughest days on the Pennine Way. It took me two full days and a half day at each end, with a 12 kg pack. On the two full days I found it necessary to walk 15 hours the first and 16 hours the second to reach the mileage I needed to keep to my schedule. The Offa’s Dyke section is the hardest, but the Mortimer and Shropshire Ways are no doddle.

Parts of Mortimer and Offa are on poor paths, so have high blister potential, as Madeleine found. Not as bad as the trackless wastes of the HoS, though. I used your cocoa butter anti-blister treatment (the crème, not the lotion) and it worked a treat.

Everest and the Poppyline? Somewhere between the two, but closer to the former. According to digital mapping, ascent in the first half, to the breakfast stop CP7, is 3100m, 10168 feet; in the second half, to the end, ascent is 1990m, 6530 feet. So about 2/3rds Everest, but fortunately you won’t need oxygen. It sounds worse than it is: Most is on good track and some is on road. From Bridges to the Long Mynd, for example, which looks an awful slog on the map, is actually not bad going. The beech avenue up Linley Hill is beautiful: great, stately trees leading apparently nowhere, but lending wonderful atmosphere.

No doubt that we’ll enjoy it.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Wed 11th May 2011, 9:01
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Well done to everyone who completed or attempted the Marshalls walk. I reccied the route a few weeks ago and totally agree with Madeleine - its not a 100 to be taken lightly, and think it is on a par with Exmoor 100 for difficulty, but its a cracking route and I think as long as you don't have too high expectations about your time, (there isn't that many fast sections) you'll "enjoy" it. I can empathise with madeleine - I pulled out of the Yoredale 100 at 78 miles - I'd got blisters after 10 miles and the pain started to break down my resolve. When I got back to the hotel after pulling out, some friends had decorated our room with 'congratulation' posters and balloons and there was a bottle of champagne in there - I felt terrible, and often beat myself up about it. I made the mistake of slipping into a pub for a pint and totally lost focus and drive, but the pint was nice...
Author: Madeleine Watson
Posted: Sat 7th May 2011, 15:43
Joined: 2002
Local Group: West Yorkshire
As has been mentioned before, I think it's mostly in the head (assuming you can do 50 miles or so). There is a lot of climb on the Housman, but it's easier going under foot than the Heart of Scotland. Certainly no deer fences in sight! For me this year was harder than the last 2, partly because there was more hours of darkness on the Marshal's event (navigation is slower), but also I think because of my naive expectations. I am much fitter this year than in recent years, and thought I'd got them sussed! Oh dear! I got blisters at Knighton. Very early on I thought. But I had bad blisters on the Heart of Scotland. My main trouble this year was in not taking one checkpoint at a time. It's hard to imagine doing another 10 hours when you've had enough! Just going to the next checkpoint is not so much for an addled brain to cope with. I was also surprised at how disappointed I felt in retiring - not for the first day or so, but the rest of this week. The event wasn't going very well for me, but in hindsight, it would have been better for me to stagger on. So take heed - treat this event with the respect it deserves! Enjoy the absolutely superb scenery and hope it continues to rain before the event to soften up the ground a bit!
Author: Philip Clarke
Posted: Sat 7th May 2011, 15:37
Joined: 1995
Local Group: Marches
Oops sorry last post on wrong topic!
Author: Philip Clarke
Posted: Sat 7th May 2011, 15:35
Joined: 1995
Local Group: Marches
Entries now coming in for the Wistanstow Challenge in South West Shropshire on Sep 10th, 20, 18 and 12 mile routes visiting Clun and Bishop's Castle, visit www.wistanstowwalk.blogspot.com for entry form and further details.
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Fri 6th May 2011, 17:14
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
Looking back I felt the Housman had more climbing that H of S but less than Cant Canolbarth. That was reflected in my times - 34 hours 20 for H of S, 35 hours 10 for Housman and 37 hours 19 for Cant Canolbarth. Having said that - I finished Cant Canolbarth and Housman in pretty reasonable shape for someone who had just walked 100 miles - I felt pretty rough in the last stages and at the end of H of S and it took quite a time to recover so I suspect I went too fast. The hardest section of any Hundred I have ever done was the 3 miles along the road to Fortingall on the Heart of Scotland. Dead flat but 3 miles in the wrong direction when the end for the marshals walk - Aberfeldy - was practically in sight. A psychological killer.Seriously - if you managed Cant Canolbarth and or H of S I don't think you will have a problem.
Author: David Powell
Posted: Fri 6th May 2011, 17:07
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Heart of England
Mike- After 20 miles or so of Offas Dyke you'll reach a point called "Offas Head" - you'll know
instinctively you're there as the normal rules of logic will be temporarily suspended.

They say there's no such thing as an easy hundred and this certainly proves the point. The scenery though is
fabulous- We got lost in the grounds of Stokesy Castle just as the second dawn was breaking -
it was almost a religious experience.
Author: Mike Childs
Posted: Thu 5th May 2011, 20:30
Joined: 1990
Local Group: Dorset
David

I am glad to know you finished OK. Well Done - it sounds great

I am really looking foward to the event - However, as one of the regular (and very one paced) backmarkers on these events, I would actually like to know how you thought it compared in time and difficulty with the HoS - and / or the last Mid Wales 100. I am already being made a bit uneasy (probably unnecessarily so) by the conficting reports of the vast and unfeasible amount of the ascent. The last I heard, it being suggested that was nearly as much as Everest. However I thought someones comparison of the Housman to the Badwater Death Valley 126 was a bit unsporting . At least Shropshire is not in the Colorado Desert. Er, is it ?

Please confirm that it is all a misunderstanding, and that the route is reasonably flat (tish) or maybe gently undulating with a few easy stiles. A bit like the Poppyline 50 in fact.

It is OK to lie, if you think it will make me feel better ...

thanks
Author: David Powell
Posted: Wed 4th May 2011, 23:12
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Heart of England
As the final finisher on the marshals 100 with 10 mins left on the clock - I'd like to say what a wonderful event - How did
the organisers know the exact limits of my endurance. "Those blue remembered hills" are forever etched on my memory
and on my feet. Thankyou to every one and especially to Tony for guiding us round the last 3 miles.
Author: Ken Falconer
Posted: Tue 3rd May 2011, 18:34
Joined: 1983
Local Group: Heart of Scotland
Many thanks to Matt and all those involved in organising or helping for the Housman 100 Marshals' Walk over the weekend. It was a great walk with excellent support - the route, scenery and views were superb. There was a lot of up and down which, in my view, made it one of the tougher 100s, and this was accentuated by the daytime heat. I'm now looking forward to swapping roles and helping in four weeks time.

If anyone on the main event is seeking advice, I would say: 1. Don't stint on warm clothing - even though it was hot during the day there was a very cold wind on the ridges during the night and most walkers put on all their spare clothing, hats, gloves, etc. 2. Get some practice at climbing stiles! 3. Enjoy the walk!

Once again, thanks to the team for all their efforts.
Author: David Powell
Posted: Thu 14th Apr 2011, 21:35
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Heart of England
Hi All
If anyone wants to reccie the "undulations" out from Knighton to Lydham (approx 20 miles) we (Heart of England) have a social walk booked on Easter Monday starting from the Offa's Dyke Centre at 0830 I have arranged a minibus for the return journey cost £5 per person. Anyone wishing to attend must email me to confirm on davedirect@hotmail.co.uk

Have just put the whole route onto memory map and I must say what a fabulous course it appears to be- parts of Shropshire I'd never heard of
and undulations I've never seen before. I think training for this one should not only include putting "miles into legs " but also putting "feet into legs" if you'll forgive the pun.

Regards
Dave Powell
Author: Timothy Evans
Posted: Tue 12th Apr 2011, 12:39
Joined: 2010
Local Group: Marches
We noticed them near to Bishops Castle whilst reccying knighton to lydham at the weekend, assumed they were part of a circular route near BC.

Got to test drive Mainstone Village Hall as there was another walking group checkpoint there at the weekend and they let us use the facilities.

The road bit between bishops castle and lydham was lethal, hope it is quieter in the wee small hours of sunday morning.
Author: Merrian Lancaster
Posted: Mon 11th Apr 2011, 16:38
Joined: 1996
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
While walking the route last week, I noticed 3 white-topped pins on several posts, not quite throughout the route, but on quite a bit of it. Has the route been marked now? Any ideas?
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Mon 11th Apr 2011, 9:14
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
Ian - I didn't realise you allowed Edith to SLEEP - on a CAMP BED - you'll be telling me next that she has a sleeping bag and you even feed her on occasions. I unreservedly withdraw my comments!
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Fri 8th Apr 2011, 22:25
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
Janet, I must admit I do like reading your posts, as I think we have the same sense of humour. But I must take issue with your use of the word "hero's". I do believe that word gets over used these days and believe me I've been called a few thing in the passed and that is not one of them.

OK so It may sound corny but both John Wood and myself do like helping out on the hundreds and in a small way we are giving something back to the club that as given us countless hours of fun over the years. Yes I do realise that maybe I'm the figure head of the baggage team, but we are a team and it's the ladies back at the finish who do the real work.

And being a true Yorkshireman I keep telling Edith it's part of our annual holidays and spending 3 nights sleeping on a camp bed is just like a camping holiday without having to put up a tent.

ian.
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Fri 8th Apr 2011, 20:00
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
Elton - yes there will be lifts on the Friday - we cannot have access to the school before 6pm but after that a minibus service will operate. I was tempted to let you all walk back on the Monday but Emlyn our transport supremo is more compassionate and there will certainly be lifts back.
And yes - its people like Edith and Ian who are the real heros of the Hundred.
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Fri 8th Apr 2011, 17:23
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
Mike,

Thankyou for your kind words but I'm only one in a team who turn up year after year to "do" the baggage. This will be our 15th year on the trot doing it and we are already booked in for 2012, 2013 and I do believe 2014 as well. But it's the unsung helpers like my wife Edith who as helped out on the last 23 hundreds on the trot, and with the other ladies who turn up year after year to help her out, who you should be giving the praise to, but they very rarely get any acknowledgement.

ian.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Thu 7th Apr 2011, 20:35
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Janet: My knees will be particularly happy to hear there are no hills, only undulations. So we can forget those silly numbers like 17,000’ and 16,000’ from the forum, can we? Undulations just don’t do climbs like that. Maybe someone threw in a membership number, like in the (now revised) age average.

On the subject of lifts from Ludlow to the school: will those be on Friday afternoon as well as Saturday morning and (rather crucially) back again on Monday?

Mike: You’re right, the first 50 miles is quite the worst – except for the second 50. Seriously, I found on the HoS 100 the worst stretch was from midnight until 6am on the first night (the rain didn’t help). The second night, strangely, wasn’t as bad.
Author: Mike Childs
Posted: Wed 6th Apr 2011, 21:09
Joined: 1990
Local Group: Dorset
Hi Janet (and all the rest of you on this thread)

I am looking forward to the walk. It is such a privilege to be able to enter a LDWA 100, and I am grateful for the effort that the organisers put in to the advance planning and making it happen. And we couldn't do it without people like Ian on the baggage

No doubt, at some point on the first night, I will again wonder what on earth possessed me to subject myself to another hundred, but these things pass. I always feel better after the breakfast stop. It is the first 50 miles which are the difficult ones... .
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Wed 6th Apr 2011, 19:13
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
"A rumor without a leg to stand on will get around some other way.” and apparently there is a legless and baseless rumour going round that there were some block, reserved or in some way preferential entries to the Housman Hundred. There was one preferential entry - we reserved a place for Roger Cole - the only man to have completed every Hundred - do you want to argue with that? Apart from that - every entrant to the Housman is a fully paid up individual member of the LDWA who has met the qualification requirements and whose entry was dealt with on a strictly first come first served basis. By stretching the interpretation of 530 to 562 - I am sure Ken Falconer could find a mathematical way to express it - we have squeezed into the main event everyone on the official waiting list - but no - don't even think of asking - no more!
Parking is going to be a real problem - but we are offering lifts from Ludlow station - if you are using public transport or are staying in Ludlow and can leave your car at your B and B - please check out the website for details of lifts to Moor Park School.
And the other bit of news is - the Chapel at Dolley Green - always a bit rickety - has been shut as a place fit for public use by some over zealous surveyor. Don't worry - we have an alternative at Evenjobb just to the South of Dolley Green and very marginally off route - details will be in the final route description issued after the Marshals walk (no its not a 3 mile detour - look at the map).
Interesting discussion on the Housman Hundred website about the feet of ascent - let me explain - we decided that on this 100 there were to be no hills -only undulations. In particular there is a fine undulation on the way out of Knighton. If you haven't recced it yet - you will love it!
Author: Eileen Greenwood
Posted: Tue 8th Mar 2011, 20:37
Joined: 2002
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
And I thought big hairy loveable dogs came to the rescue with a wee dram. Nope it's John Dally. But will he part with it though....
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Mon 7th Mar 2011, 20:24
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
John, you'll have to hide it well. The baggage team are partial to a wee dram as well.

Ian.
Author: John Dally
Posted: Mon 7th Mar 2011, 18:02
Joined: 1990
Local Group: East Yorkshire
I have solved drink problem by carrying a miniature of single malt scotch from the start, replenishing this with another in my breakfast bag. This is purely to get rid of the build-up of clag in my mouth after assorted foods and drink at the various checkpoints - brushing my teeth is a poor alternative. The scotch is definitely not for putting in coffee as one philistine who asked for some on a recent Fellsman planned to do
Author: Timothy Evans
Posted: Tue 15th Feb 2011, 13:14
Joined: 2010
Local Group: Marches
Cheers Janet !!

Good news about The Bridges (Horseshoes)
Author: W. Paul Tremere
Posted: Mon 14th Feb 2011, 19:27
Joined: 1989
Local Group: East Yorkshire
In reply to Joe’s post of Monday 7th February.
Footwear selection is very personal, simply because we all have different feet, but its important that they fit.
Two of my walking companions thought they had solved the problem and bought identical trainers, albeit of different sizes. After about 40miles of the Millennium Hundred both began to experience discomfort with their right feet. Close inspection of the footwear revealed that they were wearing each other’s right trainer alongside their own left one. Once the correct trainer was on the correct foot they continued without further trouble!
Author: Janet R Pitt-Lewis
Posted: Sun 13th Feb 2011, 12:56
Joined: 1993
Local Group: Marches
Temperance society - nonsense
The Riverside Inn at Aymestrey, The Stagg at Titley, and any one or more of the numerous hostelries in Knighton shoud set you up on the first day - with a bit of a turn of speed you should make it to the Crown at Newcastle on Clun - and a runner could enjoy the microbreweries of Bishops Castle (bit of a challenge for a walker I admit.) Day 2 more problematic - but if you dawdle after breakfast you could fit in an early lunch time pint at the Mytton Arms Habberley. Then the good news is that the pub at Bridges - known as the Bridges although the sign says the Horseshoe Inn - which closed a few months ago - is now looking as if about to reopen. You only need to cross the road at Bromfield to the Clive - and there is a tunnel so you need not worry about traffic. Personally I would not climb into Ludlow on a short but steep diversion from Dinham Bridge to find a pint but you would not be disqualified if you did so.
Author: Timothy Evans
Posted: Fri 11th Feb 2011, 8:49
Joined: 2010
Local Group: Marches
Having practiced most of the route we have come to the conclusion that it was devised by the temperance society. We havent passed an open pub yet. They will probably be closed by the time we get to Knighton or Bishops castle, unless the mytton arms in habberley can do me a breakfast pint!! Cheers for the advice guys and apologies to the OP for hijacking his post!!
Author: Ian Sykes
Posted: Thu 10th Feb 2011, 19:56
Joined: 1986
Local Group: East Yorkshire
Or if there's a pub at around 35miles you can pop in for a bar meal and a few beers. Just right to set you up for the night section ;-)

Ian Sykes.
Author: Peter Haslam
Posted: Thu 10th Feb 2011, 19:42
Joined: 1992
Local Group: East Lancashire
No need to carry food 70 miles, put some of your favorite stuff in your breakfast bag.
I used to have a Muller Rice and some oat bars waiting for me.

(on the odd occasion I made it that far)
Author: Michael Cook
Posted: Thu 10th Feb 2011, 18:50
Joined: 2007
Local Group: Marches
Hi Tim, welcome to the world of the Hundreds! We're also local to the Long Mynd Hike and this years Housman Hundred. With regards to nutrition, you are going to need energy, lots of it! I believe you need to be consuming around 9,000 to 10,000 calories to fuel your body for this event. All the checkpoints provide excellent food, you will not go hungary but I would ensure that you are eating savoury foods as well as sugary ones, to replace lost salts. As David said, eat foods that YOU enjoy. If you have a particular favourite something, take it with you. You may have to carry it for 70 miles but when you are sick to death of rice pudding you'll be really glad you found room in your rucksack!! We also take with us some energy gels. A case of trial and error really, some are more palatable than others, but when one is struggling to swallow solids, they definately are also worth some space in that rucksack!
Author: David Morgan
Posted: Wed 9th Feb 2011, 16:17
Joined: 1994
Local Group: South Wales
Hi Tim,

East little and often at the checkpoints. Remember that you are eating for the next few hours, and also that your body is going to use 1000's of calories getting you around the route.
As for before the event, eat what you enjoy, and just relax, but make sure you don't dehydrate yourself.
As for after the event, you won't stop eating for a week!!!! Well, that's what happens to my body anyway!!

Regards,

David
Author: Timothy Evans
Posted: Wed 9th Feb 2011, 13:11
Joined: 2010
Local Group: Marches
I will also be taking part in the housman for my first 100 - after 5 succesful completions of the Long Mynd Hike.

Being local i have already practiced at least 70% of the route which is stunning but hard work i reckon!

In answer to the OP - I have used boots once on the long mynd and now exclusively use trainers. Either inov8 or a pair of Walsh trail shoes (not the lightweight pure fell running ones). As the other poster said, your feet will get wet, i have tried waterproof socks but got blisters after 4 miles on the longmynd this year. One of my walking partners uses waterproof socks with no problems - we'll see how she gets on in the 100!

Can anyyone direct me to any decent information about nutrition, both before and during the event including info on energy drinks.

Cheers and good luck Joe!

Tim
Author: David Morgan
Posted: Mon 7th Feb 2011, 15:42
Joined: 1994
Local Group: South Wales
Hi Joe,

I've done several hundreds now, and in the early days naiively used boots as it was traditional to go walking in a pair. This caused me to have knee problems in the latter stages due to the additional weight as a result of the many thousands of steps cumulatively adding up.
For the last 6 years I have used trainers, and have been comfortable in merrell trainers. Now I use Montrail sabinos, but ultimately, you will have to find a pair that are comfortable for you. You will get wet feet, and your feet will still hurt, but the lightness of the shoe far outweighs those disadvantages.
Hope this helps, and good luck on your first attempt.

David
Author: Joe Williams
Posted: Mon 7th Feb 2011, 9:36
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Yorkshire Coast
Hi
This year will be my first attempt at a hundred miles, any tips on footwear appreciated.
trainers or boots?
Joe

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