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Discussion Forum - Gear ! - Bum bags


Author: Sue Allonby
Posted: Mon 26th Mar 2007, 13:09
Joined: 2003
I think if I'd carted red satin shoes up a hill I'd feel obliged to put them on (at least for a photo). I was once less lucky on a lakeland top when I found a part-chewed, hair-covered dog's bone at the bottom of my sac (most unappetising, even for emergency use!)
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Mon 26th Mar 2007, 12:33
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
I once went walking in Snowdonia in Wales with my 40 litre rucksack. At the top of one of the hills I started to unpack it to find my sandwiches only to realise I had a pair of red satin high heeled shoes still in there from a previous (non walking) weekend away. Stupid or just well prepared? Well one never knows when you might need a pair......Just goes to show the bigger the sack the more junk you carry and not realise....
Author: Sue Allonby
Posted: Mon 26th Mar 2007, 11:03
Joined: 2003
I nearly always carry a 25l sac, mainly because it's stable and comfy, with a belt on the hips rather than the waist. In summer it's probably too big, but a spare fleece will 'fill the gap', whilst in winter it's big enough to include spare socks, hat, crampons etc. I always carry a 1st aid kit which is more extensive than just the very basic (my husband is usually quite derisive of its size) but I've actually used it more on organised events than when walking alone, so still carry it regardless. And yes, I can (just) get away wth the 25l sac for a summer weekend backpacking. Of course it's all down to personal preference, and, of course, available budget!
Author: Matthew Hand
Posted: Fri 23rd Mar 2007, 22:47
Joined: 2001
Local Group: Mid Wales
How much you carry is a bit like a personal 'risk assessment'. If you aim to do an event and are travelling fast, then obviously it can be pared down to a minimum. On a hundred with checkpoints every 8 miles? a runner will carry the bare minimum, he'll refuell every 2 hours max at checkpoints, is probably generating a much higher body temperature, so he keeps extra clothing to a minimum weight/size; and what else is there to consider? Not likely to need much emergency kit on an event with loads of walkers on the course.
I can fit everything in my 10 litre sac (including food and drink) for an event. But tomorrow I am off on the mountains for a long solo walk, no mobile contact (I don't own a mobile) or chance of being found, so I shall carry my 15 litre sac and some extra stuff. Horses for courses, but for the life of me I don't know what some people carry in their sacs.

Actually, I had a friend once who used to carry a cast iron boot 'puller offer' in his rucsac!! Matt.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Fri 23rd Mar 2007, 14:20
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
I'd certainly like to know how you manage to get all the kit required for the Hundred into a reasonably sized bumbag. Do tell!
Author: Julian Brown
Posted: Fri 23rd Mar 2007, 11:36
Joined: 1998
Local Group: Staffordshire
At the risk of being controversial I nearly always use a bumbag an all events. It holds all I need to take (and meet the kit requirements !) - if you buy the right kit, and take only what you need, you don't need much space. If you want to know what I take please ask. I agree though a heavy bumbag is very uncomfortable.

I took a 12 litre sack on the long mynd hike where you need all your own food, (I know plenty of people who take similar sacks on 2 day mountain marathons.), and a slightly bigger one on the high peak marathon where you need a tent / sleeping bag.

I'd love to know what people who completely fill 25 litre sacks on day / challenge walks take with them, then again I did that when I started events I suppose.... A couple of pals travelled the world (camping) for 9 months whth 25 litre sacks, they were fine.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Thu 22nd Mar 2007, 10:03
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks for all the advice. After condsidering all the pros and cons, I went for the Lowe Alpine Rush 25. It arrived this morning - beautiful pack. Interesting that it has a 'sternum strap' rather than a chest strap. It is high up on the chest, with obvious advantages for women. It has waist belt pockets too, useful when you discover after two miles that your keys in your trouser pockets are digging into your leg. It looks a robust little pack as well, always a concern when going for light weight gear.
Author: Nick Ham
Posted: Mon 19th Mar 2007, 22:03
Joined: 1998
Local Group: South Manchester
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Sun 18th Mar 2007, 18:00
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks Norman, I'll look into that.
Author: Norman C Corrin
Posted: Sat 17th Mar 2007, 19:34
Joined: 1981
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
Elton if you have a look on The Original Mountain Marathon website you will be able to find some excellent lightweight rucksacs there. I've attached the link for the one that I bought in December. Excellent value for money.

http://www.theomm.com/packs_Classic_MM25L.html

Forget bum bags, worth it only for something like a 20km walk on a hot summers day.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Fri 16th Mar 2007, 19:59
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Thanks for the good and detailed advice.

Bum bag - binned.

Day pack - soft cloth conforming back, chest strap on shoulder straps, and waist strap. Mesh side pockets for easy access to water bottle and mug.

Not many 25l around which meet those criteria, so maybe I'll go for a 20l.
Author: Sue Allonby
Posted: Tue 13th Mar 2007, 14:59
Joined: 2003
I once received one of the larger bumbags as a present, and can confirm that it's no use for longer walks or for jogging, as it's not as stable as a daysac and you need to tighten it up way too much for comfort to stop it bouncing around too much, especially if it's got a full water bottle in.
Author: Nick Ham
Posted: Tue 13th Mar 2007, 13:01
Joined: 1998
Local Group: South Manchester
I agree with Matt. Bum bags are too small to carry 100 kit requirements. Bum bags are only good for single day runs that require minimal kit or spare clothing (i.e. the weather forecast is good). Too much weight in bum bag causes waist strap to cut into your stomach because you have to pull it tight to stop it bouncing.

Longer events with larger kit requirements need a rucksack. I find a 25 litre size to be ideal. It needs a soft, non-mesh back that conforms to your back (DON'T go for a hard backed one that's intended to promote ventilation) otherwise it will always be on the move and cause chafing. Also it needs to be well strapped on with chest and waist straps to stop it bouncing when you run.

One water bottle is ample to last you between checkpoints on most LDWA events in this country. You only need two in the summertime when the weather gets hot.
Author: Matthew Hand
Posted: Mon 12th Mar 2007, 21:55
Joined: 2001
Local Group: Mid Wales
Personally speaking I would never use a bumbag to carry weight any distance, find they give me back ache. Bumbag fine for something very light - basic gear for fell races - other than that I would always chose a back pack. Masses of choice, pick a good make and try them on for size - a bit like shoes, they don't necessarily fit every body shape. Matt.
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Mon 12th Mar 2007, 10:50
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Advice on bum bags needed. Are they better for the Hundred than a day backpack? What capacity? Two water bottles, one, or none? Mesh back? Any particular make better than others? One big compartment or lots of little ones? Thanks...

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