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Discussion Forum - Gear ! - Shorter walking poles


Author: David Sawdon
Posted: Sat 30th Jul 2016, 16:13
Joined: 2016
Local Group: Wessex
Have a look at Pacer Poles http://www.pacerpole.com/product - the 3-section versions pack fairly short and the difference the angled head makes is astonishing. I've used several makes of poles over the years but the Pacer poles make hills less steep and significantly increase walking speed. Everyone who's tried mine has been surprised at the difference they make.

Separately from the above, these days I don't stow my poles when hiking. All I do (while wearing the rucksac) is slip the end of the pole down between the waist band and the lower bag strap and then wrap the pole strap around the shoulder strap (sounds odd when written down but only takes a few seconds). It means the poles are out of the way for most activities but quickly available without having to stop - so packing length doesn't matter and the poles get used more.
Author: Paul Glynn
Posted: Fri 15th Apr 2016, 20:59
Joined: 2015
Local Group: Wessex
I've used Fizan compact 4 poles for the last 2 years, very light and pack down small (50 cm furled, 49.5cm disassembled) - expensive but in my view worth it.
I used the 3-section Fizan poles previously, gave good service but the 4-section poles have the edge.
Author: Iain Connell
Posted: Tue 22nd Mar 2016, 11:49
Joined: 2010
Local Group: East Lancashire
Author: Iain Connell
Posted: Thu 12th Feb 2015, 11:45
Joined: 2010
Local Group: East Lancashire
Trekmate pole: It's been a year and I'm still using it, so I guess I'll have to recommend it. It must the lightest on the market, if not the shortest fully furled. It was cheaper than many competitors, though I doubt it will last for a second year.

As previously described, section 2 of 4 (ground up) disappeared into its lower neighbour early on, so I use the remaining three extended to just below the safety marks. The tip is surviving well though I lost the outer flange (they can work loose if not firmly screwed on) and replaced it with a spare. The lower of the two remaining tighteners doesn't - tighten that is - so I fit together sections 1 and 3 without its assistance.

It's ok like that if not ideal - on the occasions I don't take it I realise how much I rely on its help - old knee problems - though I use just this one and swap it over as necessary. Poles undoubtedly do reduce impact and stress on the lower legs if not the feet, but they are something of a nuisance when negotiating stiles and two-hand obstacles such as gate fasteners. Some pole people seem unaware that when not in use they carry them with the business end(s) sticking out behind - please keep them upright as far as possible, or when carried horizontally (they all have a balance point) make sure the tip is in front of you where you can see it. Thanks.

Iain
Author: Raymond Wilkes
Posted: Thu 19th Jun 2014, 23:06
Joined: 2013
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Have a look at Black Diamond, 3 sections, various lengths. Just long enough for someone 5' 4". After using Leki, I find Black Diamond very practical
Some rucsacs have side meshes and you can stow poles vertically at the side,, which is neater.
Beware of some 4 section poles where bottom section can easily drop out leaving you with a very short pole!
Author: Iain Connell
Posted: Thu 19th Jun 2014, 14:14
Joined: 2010
Local Group: East Lancashire
Trekmates poles news: against expectations, it's still in use, albeit with only three of its four pieces, and surviving the usual mis-treatment (though I don't throw it about, much). The (now two) tighteners are a little difficult to loosen after use, but seem to be surviving ok, and apart from the expected scratches and abrasions it's doing pretty well. It compacts nicely and is, as was the intention, easy to carry on top of or slung behind the rucksack without catching on branches or becoming stuck in narrow gaps.

I cut the wrist-strap off early on, since an early model gave me severe shoulder problems after its tip became lodged between rocks, but apart from that (and having to extend both lower pieces to full length when in use), it's survived its first seven months much better than anticipated. If it makes it to a year I might go so far as to recommend it.

Iain.
Author: Raymond Wilkes
Posted: Sat 22nd Feb 2014, 21:18
Joined: 2013
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Author: Iain Connell
Posted: Sun 9th Feb 2014, 15:43
Joined: 2010
Local Group: East Lancashire
Latest on the Trekmates poles: as I feared might happen, the four-segment and very lightweight pole has developed problems after only three months of use (though chucking it over fences probably doesn't help). The middle of the three tighteners has come off and I can't get it to stay back on; segment 3 has become wedged inside segment 2 and I don't want to force it out and risk damage.

Temporary solution: it's three segments fully extended, overall length the same as the previous one (which lasted three years not three months). I expect it'll fail fairly soon, hopefully without breaking (dangerous) or bending (easy to do, like predecessor). Memo to self: do not throw cheap lightweight gear over walls and fences, particularly when there are rocks on the other side.

Iain
Author: Iain Connell
Posted: Fri 1st Nov 2013, 13:48
Joined: 2010
Local Group: East Lancashire
Thanks. I looked online at Trailblaze, but the price is a bit high for me, so trailed again round local shops. One which is about to close had a last set of Trekmaktes Compact Slimline poles, which when compacted measures just 45cm (maximum 120cm unfurled), the smallest in the range. It's in four sections (three tighteners), which may make it a little less robust than others but is short enough both for carrying and for my height. Local price for a single pole was good too.

Iain
Author: Matthew Hand
Posted: Wed 23rd Oct 2013, 20:35
Joined: 2001
Local Group: Mid Wales
I use the Trailblaze, "Mountain King" poles, they are 4pce not adjustable in length, but they come in different lengths - so you measure and chose your ideal. I can't fault mine, very light and also tough (enough for me). I buy mine from Likeys as they are local.
http://www.likeys.com/acatalog/Trekking_Trekking_Poles.html
Author: Iain Connell
Posted: Wed 23rd Oct 2013, 14:12
Joined: 2010
Local Group: East Lancashire
Anyone know of a walking pole which is shorter when *furled* (not in use) than the more commonly found varieties, that is, no more than about half a metre (one and a half feet) ?

The familiar makes, e.g. Leki, Vango, are too long to be easily carriable (e.g. laid across the top of a rucksack rather than attached vertically), particularly by short(er) people like me; and we've all left one behind, haven't we ?

I had one such (the previous to current, which is worn out), but found it only by chance, haven't seen one like it since, and yes, I've forgotten the maker name (no clues from the many online sites).

Walking poles for the vertically challenged, please. (Minimum length, not maximum).

Thanks, Iain

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