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Discussion Forum - Events - Recce-ing the 100


Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Thu 3rd May 2012, 12:34
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Thanks for that, so definately no cheating then!!
Author: R Neil Higham
Posted: Tue 1st May 2012, 15:19
Joined: 1980
Local Group: Kent
Rebecca, Hi

Really glad that you have enjoyed the varied scenery.

Many apologies for the delay in replying to your post of Sunday 22nd, but I needed to double check with the Route Editor (and he was away last week) as I wanted to get this correct.

Anyway, the answer to your question is definitely a MAYBE!

It is worth mentioning that we are aware that the location you highlight (in Windsor Great Park) is not the only place where an entrant may, ahem, ‘inadvertently’ diverge from the official route so - in addition to the three self clip points and one marshalled clip point (this one will be at the O2 / North Greenwich Arena / Millennium Dome) which will be specified in the final route description – in order to keep you all on your toes (or soles of your feet), there will be a number of marshalled clip points at random locations on the route.

Games 100 Organising Committee
Author: Elton Ellis
Posted: Tue 1st May 2012, 11:52
Joined: 2006
Local Group: Surrey
Further to Amorel’s advice on carrying the RD in an A4 plastic folder/pocket/pouch, I have found that it is also helpful to trim the sides of the RD by a few millimetres on each side. This makes it much easier to slide the RD back inside the pouch when you change from one page to the next. This is particularly useful at night when, to the total bafflement of the laws of science, the operation becomes much harder.

It is also best to use matt pouches rather than gloss, as matt reflects torch light less, making the RD easier to read at night.

I usually put my RDs in the pouch upside down, ie the top of the RD at the closed end of the pouch, in case of rain. As I have the pouch RD clutched in my hand or rammed into my pocket, I have never had a problem of the RD falling out of the pouch. Dropping the whole lot, yes; losing the RD and not the pouch, no.
Author: Rebecca Lawrence
Posted: Sun 22nd Apr 2012, 19:45
Joined: 2003
Local Group: Marches
Just returned home from reccying the route over 5 days (backpacking for softies and stopping in pubs and hotels en route!)

Fantastic route, a real mix, and obvious that a huge amount of thought has gone into this. Saw many herds of deer, foxes, and the infamous ringed necked parakeets!

The RD is a work of art and must have taken several weeks to put together and goes to show the hours of work to put an event like this together.

The detail was fine for me and gave a lot of reassurance, and we didn't go wrong at all, but perhaps minus the Health and Safety advice which amounts to common sense? (roots etc)...the warnings about holes I agree are good though.

On question - will there be a self clip on the 'dog leg' bit through windsor great park? There is an obvious straight path which would completely miss this out, and after 90 odd miles, there may be some temptation to take the shortest route?
Author: R Neil Higham
Posted: Thu 19th Apr 2012, 18:02
Joined: 1980
Local Group: Kent
Mark, Hi

Unfortunately there isn’t a more concise RD available - and very unlikely to be one.

We would certainly strongly caution you against any heavy editing, certainly after the first 30 miles, as this may come back to ‘bite’ you – this is not meant to be scaremongering, but I walked a 5 mile section (+ had to do 5 miles to return!) one night a week or so ago and found that I was definitely glad that I had the (full) Route Description for that section. Perhaps not so remarkable ……. BUT I am the ‘Route Warden’ for a 20 mile stretch of the route including that 5 mile section, and so have walked that at least 5 times over the past 15 months and know exactly what it looks like in daylight (and when fully compos mentis!). And it’s not always as simple as just “staying on route”, as – for instance - the hazard warnings are there for a good reason!

Games 100 Organising Committee
Author: C Mark Edwards
Posted: Sun 15th Apr 2012, 19:37
Joined: 1980
Local Group: Merseystride
As I have both paid MemoryMap and Garmin significant amounts of money to have all the GB 50:000 maps both on my computer and on my GPS, I'm not getting the Harvey map. For the last few hundreds, I've printed out the route description and maps, with a map on the reverse side of each section of description (first stage map on reverse of final description page, second stage map on reverse of first description page). The whole lot goes inside a waterproof Ortlieb map-case. So at each checkpoint (whilst in the dry) I can take one sheet out of the front of the map-case and put it in the back and ensure that I always have the relevant sections of both description and map available (something that is difficult with standard OS maps as you always seem to go over the edges at the most inconvenient places, and generally don't keep that close a look at the map to know when you need to turn it).

I've sometimes had to edit the description a bit, or adjust font sizes to ensure that each stage fits on a single side of paper, but it looks like I might have a bit more of a challenge this year as the description extends to some 32 pages (ignoring the 4 pages of introductions) and I'd like to get this on 18 legible pages. If there was a more concise route description available, I'd certainly be interested - having a GPS which displays the OS map and has the route marked means that I'm confident of staying on route. Whilst I appreciate all the work that has gone into creating such a detailed route description, I shall be attempting some fairly heavy editing this year to bring it down to size.
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Sun 15th Apr 2012, 10:51
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
I usually laminate the pages, which solves the waterproofing problem. Others have recommended printing onto waterproof paper, although this seems an expensive option. Whatever you use, it's a good thing to be able to write on the page to tick off each instruction as you complete it, otherwise it is easy to lose your place, especially as you get tired.

Did the first part of the route to Marshals CP1. Many of the route instructions referred to pubs or restaurants and the checkpoint is in a pub car park. The route checkers must have had a nice time!
A fascinating first few miles with lots to see especially for anyone not familiar with recent East London developments. Make sure you start with an empty bladder. There aren't many bushes to nip behind and although the organisers helpfully identify nearby public toilets, these will require some diversion from the route.

Plenty of grass to walk on for the first mile or two but hard unyielding sufaces after that so take care of the feet. The huge number of tourists in the Cutty Sark/Greenwich area were a bit of a shock. I even had to take a diversion from the route through the Naval College as they were filming a historical drama there.
Author: Armorel Young
Posted: Tue 10th Apr 2012, 16:08
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Sherwood
The route description is indeed almost too thorough - but that's what it seems like in daylight; I have a feeling that in the dark we may be very grateful for its attention to detail and its "belt and braces" approach that gives you enough information to check that you have done the right thing.

As for keeping track of the pages, I found that one of those flimsy transparent A4 pouches designed for putting in ring binders worked very well - holding it so that it is open at the top, it's easy to move a page from front to back as you finish with it (just need to rethink that plan if it rains :-)

St. Martha's Hill came as a bit of a shock to me - I was prepared for up and down, but not for something so steep that you almost slide down while trying to walk up it. Indeed, if the path turned wet and slippery it could prove quite a challenge!
Author: Tony Willey
Posted: Mon 9th Apr 2012, 16:57
Joined: 1989
Local Group: Lakeland
I walked the route from Woldingham to the breakfast stop and agree that the route description is first class. Almost too good as occasionally the narrative suggests more complexity than is the case on the ground, but if followed precisely it would be hard to go wrong. Keeping control of 35 pages of route description is going to be a task in itself - is this the longest Hundred RD ever?
I agree with Madelaine that the North Downs Way section has some lovely views, although the first bit is something of a Tour du M25.
Down in London later this week for my first training session as an Olympic volunteer (Gamesmaker in Olympicspeak). Hope to find time to walk the first few miles of the route - looks to be a bit of a needle threading exercise.
Author: Madeleine Watson
Posted: Sun 8th Apr 2012, 18:27
Joined: 2002
Local Group: West Yorkshire
Having recce'd the middle section, I agree that the route description is very good. I missed one small path just before Tanner Hatch YH (obviously not paying attention!) and had to back track where I hadn't read the instructions properly (total case of "use error"!). Stunning views over the Downs. Glad I managed to see them in daylight.
Author: Armorel Young
Posted: Sun 8th Apr 2012, 14:33
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Sherwood
Having now walked the entire route (over 4 days), I can confirm that the route description is a masterpiece. I feared I was in for trouble after making a complete pig's ear of the very first instruction ("With your back to White Post Lane bridge ..."), which baffled me as I could stand with my back to the bridge facing in any direction I liked, but having got over that little hiccup the instructions were a treat to follow and I never once floundered or came unstuck. Congratulations to the anonymous heroes who have put this together.
Author: Armorel Young
Posted: Mon 2nd Apr 2012, 20:58
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Sherwood
Thanks, Norman - that's really helpful (and yes, I have noticed that the route description has recently been updated on the website).

Armorel
Author: Norman C Corrin
Posted: Mon 2nd Apr 2012, 20:24
Joined: 1981
Local Group: Beds, Bucks and Northants
Hi Armorel

As you’re doing the main event the route description you should use is that one NOT the marshals as this is slightly different to the main event .All of the diversions that you should follow when recceing the main event are detailed on the main event route description.

Have you got the latest version of the route description from the 100 website? There are now separate route descriptions for each event

Norman Corrin

Games 100 Organising Committee
Author: Armorel Young
Posted: Sat 31st Mar 2012, 22:11
Joined: 1999
Local Group: Sherwood
If I recce the 100 route (which I'm planning to do next week), should I follow the Main route description or the Marshalls one? I'm assuming the Marshalls' route is the one to use, on the grounds that a) it will avoid any permissive sections that will only be open on the weekend of the event and b) it will miss out any minor detours to checkpoints that will only be open for the event. Is my logic correct? If not, what is the difference between the routes?

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